Not sure what program is right for you? Click Here
CIEE

© 2011. All Rights Reserved.

Study Abroad in

Back to Program Back to Blog Home

« Looming Culture Shock | Main | Hanabi! »

10/18/2015

Silver Week in Shinjuku

Silver Week (シルバーウィーク Shirubā Wīku) - a string of consecutive holidays in September; more specifically, the string of three Japanese public holidays that followed the weekend.

All of Japan rose up in celebration, especially Tokyo - how lucky could we get?

As fresh new foreign faces to the country, Silver Week was not something any of us were well aware of. I remember a friend, a Japanese local, telling me a bit about it earlier. But it hadn't quite dawned on me, or my friends, until we got off the train in Shinjuku station just how big of a celebration it was.

Just to note, the combining holidays that followed the weekend were "Respect for the Aged Day" (occurs the third Monday of September and, in this case, fell on 9/21), "Autumnal Equinox Day" (9/23), and "Kokumin No Kyujitsu"( Citizens' Holiday - By Japanese law, if there is only one non-holiday in between two public holidays, that day should become an additional holiday, known as a Kokumin no kyūjitsu.) WIKIPEDIA REFERENCE

IMG_9328

Anywho, it was Sunday, September 20th and Shinjuku was packed with locals and tourists, literally flooding the streets! There were a lot of food stalls set up that range from soba-noodles to chicken skewers - I even found an Indian stall where they had Samosas! There were a few other streets blocked off for shopping and food, and I don't think it was limited to Shinjuku either. But because Shinjuku is a pretty busy district, it's great for drawing customers in.

12027600_1056623101055572_9148375523680910150_n

In order: Nikita, Julie, and Jasmine (Me!)

This was a fabulous opportunity for us to really start practicing our Japanese with the locals. Because we couldn't read the menu, we had to ask them what it was that they were selling. So, we continuously said, "tori niku ga arimasuka" (do you have chicken?), "kore wa nan desuka" (what is this?) and "ikura desuka" (how much does it cost?) and so forth. Language barriers are usually intimidating, but the merchants really appreciated the fact that we tried to speak Japanese - it made the interaction a lot more fun and relaxed.

 Now, I went on this little adventure with other CIEE students with the sole intention of just finding lunch in the middle of a street fair. Boy did we get more than what we bargained for.

After our lunch, we wound up getting a front-row seat to the parade that came through immediately after. So, not only did we come on a good day, we came at the perfect time! Dozens of locals crossed through the streets of Shinjuku, dressed in parade-clothing called はっぴ, pronounced "happi"  while piloting floats and chanting through the streets. I'm sorry to say that I could not quite figure out why the parade was going on except for the fact that it was in celebration of the holiday season. Nevertheless, it was still really fun to watch! ''

IMG_9343 

IMG_9346

 

After that, we wound up finding a stage with live music going on.

OK - I'm am one of those peoples who believe 100% that music is something that you can love and appreciate even without understanding the lyrics. This experience was no different.

I was overwhelmed with childish joy as the lead musician sang with an energy that absolutely captivated everyone. You should have seen him, jumping up and down while singing the chorus, blowing into his harmonica and strumming on his guitar  - a real "GENKI" moment.

IMG_9366

(Genki meaning energetic in this case). We also got to a see a second act, a female singer who was performing a tribute to a rather old, yet well-known-to-the-locals, song. Don't ask me what it was because I really can't remember any of the lyrics, but again, it was just so wonderful to be part of it. On some level, it felt like I was back home - I didn't feel like I had to worry about being a foreigner in the middle of a local practice. I felt welcomed and was able to enjoy the festivities because I really appreciate the culture. In the end, that's what it should be about, don't you agree?

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment